About Barney Bardsley

I am a writer and T’ai Chi and Reiki practitioner, and a member of the Performance Ensemble, where I work as a dramaturg and performer. Our recent production, ‘Crossing’, is currently being worked into a larger piece, to be performed at Leeds Playhouse in October 2020. I live in Leeds, Yorkshire. I teach independent classes across the city in Creative Writing, and run regular workshops in T’ai Chi and Chi Kung at Leeds Buddhist Centre  and the Quaker Meeting House in Roundhay, Leeds. In autumn 2018, I opened a Reiki Room in Oakwood, Leeds where I see people for one-one sessions. (See my Reiki In Leeds page and Classes with Barney page  for details.)

I have been part of  the Leeds Playhouse Creative Engagement  programme since 2009.  Leeds Playhouse is a Theatre of Sanctuary, and I have run workshops there called ‘Finding Your Voice’, to encourage confidence and performance skills in the refugee and asylum seeker community. Also, I  collaborate regularly on two exciting projects: Heydays a dynamic programme for older people; and Our Time, groundbreaking creative work for people with dementia and those who support them.

For the Every Third Minute Festival 2018 at Leeds Playhouse, I co-wrote a short play, ‘A Horse Called Freedom’, with Rosa Peterson,  a woman living with dementia. Despite the public perception of this complex condition, our work together was surprisingly poetic and uplifting. And we laughed (and cried) alot!

Rosa and I continue to write together – and most recently wrote and performed monologues for a piece called Bus Ride, brainchild of director Alan Lyddiard, and his company the Performance Ensemble. You can read more about that here.

As an arts journalist,  I have written regular freelance features for the Guardian, Psychologies Magazine and Femail, some of which you can read by going to my Blog and Features Archive page, and have published three books.

The first, way back in 1986, was Flowers in Hell, an investigation into women and crime.

The second, A Handful of Earth, came out in 2007. This was a diary of grief and recovery in the garden. (For five years I was garden correspondent for On:Yorkshire magazine, and now  write for them online, regularly reviewing books and covering all things green and arty!)

My most recent book, Old Dog, was published in 2013, and is about the exceptional bond between dogs and humans – in particular, one special mongrel called Muffin. It is also a deeper meditation on life and death, bereavement, and recovery from loss.

Currently, I am working on a new book, with the working title, ‘Wild Goose Flying’. This is a memoir of the body and what it teaches us, in sickness and in health.

I am also a linguist, am studying Hungarian – very hard language, wonderful country – and love singing, travelling to Eastern Europe, and messing about in my garden. I’ve just joined a ukulele band which is quite delightful.Communication is really important to me – in words, in movement, in voice. So having a blog gives me the chance to write, informally, sporadically, enthusiastically, whenever I choose, about whatever I like… And maybe someone will read it too!

Twitter: @BarneyBardsley

Facebook, Author: @BarneyBardsleyAuthor

Facebook, Reiki: @barneybardsleyreiki

Instagram: @reiki.in.leeds

A Handful of Earth’ (John Murray)

‘Old Dog’ (Simon and Schuster)

 

5 thoughts on “About Barney Bardsley”

  1. Hi Barney,

    I read your article ‘Requiem for a lost youth: Hitting the menopause’. I now going through a particularly difficult menopause. In the article, you mentioned you wrote another article ‘the change’ which I cannot seem to find anywhere. I am interested to read that as during this really hard time, it is kinda reassuring for me to know that there are many in the world going through similar experience and that thought keeps me sane. Thank you and I appreciate your time.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hello Serene, I am sorry you are having a hard time. It WILL PASS, but is certainly challenging whilst it’s happening. Like being a teenager again, but in a kind of reverse. All I can say is, I do definitely feel a new expansiveness, a new sense of self, now I am out the other side, so to speak. I haven’t actually written anything else on the subject, although was on the brink of having a book idea accepted, that I think would have been helpful to women. But the publishers didn’t want it in the end. There is plenty of stuff out there if you dig around. Also, I found acupuncture to be extremely helpful with dealing with many of the symptoms, and steering me into balance. Very best of luck. Be kind with yourself. Rest a lot. And thank you for being in touch. Best wishes, barney

      Like

  2. Barney,
    Thank you so much for your article about menopause being hell. You’re words have given me hope during this difficult and physically painful time. I’ve felt so alone until I read your experience.
    SB

    Like

    1. Oh, I am so pleased you found some solace in my writing. That was an article I wrote for the Guardian and Femail ten years ago! But I believe it still holds good. What a turbulent and utterly disorientating time menopause is. And isolating. But you will come through it! Meanwhile seek support wherever you can, and rest, rest, rest as much as possible. Very best wishes to you as you go on your journey.

      Like

Leave a Reply to Philip Davis Cancel reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.